Obama´s Inauguration Day


Minuto a Minuto

Obama´s Inauguration Day

  • Going Madisonian: Obama to focus on compromise

    21 Jan. 10:54 a.m. EST

    A portrait of U.S. President James Madison by artist Gilbert Stuart. (AP photo)
    by ccarlson 10:50 AM
    President Barack Obama
    will channel James Madison and speak about the centrality of compromise, his staff says.

    "He is going to say that our political system does not require us to resolve all of our differences or settle all of our disputes," says his adviser, David Plouffe, "but it is absolutely imperative that our leaders try and seek common ground when it can and should exist.
    That's going to be a very important part of the speech."

    That is the essence of the system Madison and his colleagues designed and enshrined in the Constitution, a complicated scheme of government that Americans have found frustrating at various times in the nation's history.


    It is a comment on our age that a re-elected president needs to use a healthy dose of his widely watched speech to make the case for it all over again.


    Michael Oreskes,
    AP senior managing editor for U.S. News

  • Historical context in mind

    21 Jan.  10:59 a.m. EST

    President Barack Obama will place his left hand on two Bibles while taking the oath of office - one owned by Abraham Lincoln, which he used while taking the oath four years ago,
    President Barack Obama rests his hand on President Lincoln's Inaugural Bible while taking the oath during his first inauguration.
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 14, 2013 at 5:15 PM
    and one by Martin Luther King Jr.

    Their selection is especially symbolic because Obama's second inauguration comes on the federal holiday marking King's birthday and in a milestone anniversary year involving both men.

    It was 150 years ago when Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation to end slavery, and 50 years ago when King delivered his "I Had a Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial - a monument that will be straight ahead in Obama's sight as he speaks to his country.




  • How the race was won

    21 Jan. 11:00 a.m. EST

    Electoral results from the 2012 presidential election.

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 10:56 AM


  • President Obama arrives for swearing-in

    21 Jan. 11:29 a.m. EST
    President Barack Obama arrives for his ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 11:28 AM


  • Who's absent from the inaugural ceremonies?

    21 Jan. 11:32 a.m. EST


    by Kellen Henry 11:31 AM
    Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki will not attend the ceremonies at the Capitol for security reasons. He would be the successor to head the government should catastrophe strike at the Capitol.

    The absence of a Cabinet secretary maintained a long-standing tradition that one member not attend the inaugural ceremonies.




  • The moment, and the president, has arrived

    21 Jan. 11:35 a.m. EST
    President Barack Obama arrives at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)
    by ccarlson 11:33 AM
    President Barack Obama is on the podium, greeting supporters and colleagues, and ready to be
    inaugurated for his second term _ or, at least, "inaugurated," since the official ceremony was conducted Sunday indoors.
    Today's ceremony is the public version.

  • Quotable

    21 Jan. 11:42 a.m. EST

    by Kellen Henry 11:42 AM



  • Another swearing-in stumble

    21 Jan.  1:20 p.m EST


    Chief Justice John Roberts got it right this time -- but President Barack Obama appeared to stumble over the word "states" during his ceremonial swearing in.

    In front of hundreds of thousands gathered to watch, Obama stammered briefly over "states" as he repeated back the words "the office of president of the United States."


    Obama had already been officially sworn in for a second term on Sunday, in accordance with the Constitution, which requires presidential terms to begin on Jan.
    20.

    In 2009, it was Roberts who famously flubbed Obama's official swearing in.
    As a result of that mistake, Roberts and Obama repeated the presidential oath in a private ceremony to ensure there were no constitutional issues.
    President Barack Obama's family watches during the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by Kellen Henry on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:00 PM



  • For some, a quick exit

    21 Jan. 1:22 p.m. EST

    Small streams of people began leaving the National Mall right after President Barack Obama took the oath of office, not staying to hear his inaugural speech.
    Some were making a quick exit to find a good spot along the parade route, while others wanted to get on Metrorail before the trains got too crowded.

    "You make me feel bad," said Twanda Rhodes of Longwood, Fla.
    , when asked why she was leaving. "But it's cold, and we have to catch a train."

    _ Richard Lardner, AP reporter covering foreign affairs and defense on Capitol Hill
    A crowd fills up the National Mall before at the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:17 PM

    , AP reporter


  • The 2nd time, a more intimate affair

    21 Jan. 1:24 p.m. EST
    The U.S. Capitol on Inauguration Day. AP Photo/Caleb Jones
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:07 PM
    It was altogether a more intimate affair than four years ago. Just a party of untold hundred thousands, chilling in the nation's backyard.

    No match for the staggering masses and adrenaline-pumping energy of his first turn as president on the West Front of the Capitol. But a lively second act.

    Sharon Davis of Suitland, Md., retired after 22 years in the Air Force, said it all made her proud beyond words. "There's a lot of energy here today," she said. "But it doesn't compare to last time, when it was just off the charts."

    _ Calvin Woodward, AP political reporter

  • What's in the words?

    21 Jan. 1:26 p.m. EST

    President Barack Obama's second inaugural address was so broad that in 2,114 words, he repeated only three words more than a dozen times and those words themselves weren't exactly telling but geared toward future collective action.

    The word Obama used most, except for common articles:

    will – 21 times

    us – 20 times

    must – 16 times

    people – 11 times

    •  time – 10 times

    America – 8 times

    together – 7 times 

    country – 7 times 

    make – 7 times.

    Obama was slightly less verbose than four years ago when his speech had 2,385 words, but he emphasized the same words in both addresses. He said "us" 23 times, "will" 17 times, "nation" 12 times, "new" 11 times and "America" nine times.

    Here's a look at some of the common keywords and themes that run through U.S. inaugural addresses since 1900:

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 17, 2013 at 2:30 PM




  • Americans weigh in on Obama's 2nd term

    21 Jan. 1:35 p.m. EST


    “I think that because of the reluctance of both parties to bring about bipartisan action toward the economy _ certainly everybody is affected by the economy _ I look forward to him bringing the Republicans and Democrats together.  ... I look forward to him bringing about compromising.
    – Beniam Fantu, 34, of Dallas.


    "There are no coincidences. I don't believe there are. This was exactly what was intended, to show how far we have come in our civil freedoms and in our civil rights."
    – Alenda Young, 39, of Chicago, on the inauguration ceremony occurring on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Young is president of the Monarch Awards Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Xi NU Omega chapter.


    "I think he's a great man. He's trying his best. He did a lot his last period as I think he's going to do a lot more in his next four years."
    – Karen Espinoza, 24, was working at a Hispanic market in Little Rock, Ark., as Obama addressed the nation Monday. She didn't hear the president's speech, but said she was impressed by Obama's efforts on immigration reform.


  • Miss America bundles up, doesn't bail on inauguration

    21 Jan. 1:37  p.m. EST

    Miss America 2013 Mallory Hagan arrives at the OurTime.org Inaugural Youth Ball Generation Now Party on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, in Washington. (Photo by Nick Wass/Invision/AP)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:32 PM
    Miss America Mallory Hagan says she made it to the inauguration despite the chilly weather.

    In an interview Saturday, Hagan had said she wasn't sure if she would attend President Barack Obama's public swearing-in ceremony Monday even though she had a ticket because "it's going to be freezing."


    But on Monday she tweeted a photo of herself from the inauguration wrapped in a blue scarf with the words "bundled up!" She later tweeted that she was "proud to be an American."


    Hagan, a 23-year-old Alabama native who lives in New York, won the Miss America title earlier this month.

    _ Mesfin Fekadu, AP entertainment reporter


  • First on the agenda: Nominate cabinet

    21 Jan. 2:07 p.m.

    Minutes after his inauguration speech Monday, President Barack Obama signed documents officially submitting top administration nominations to the Senate.


    Obama affirmed the nominations of:

    • John Brennan to be CIA director
    • former Sen. Chuck Hagel for defense secretary
    • Sen. John Kerry to be secretary of state
    • Jack Lew for treasury secretary

    Obama also signed a proclamation to commemorate the inauguration.
    The proclamation is entitled "National Day of Hope and Resolve, 2013."

    "I'm proclaiming peace on Earth and goodwill towards men," Obama quipped as he signed the document.


    _ Stephen Ohlemacher, AP reporter in Washington


    Nominations for Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. to be named Secretary of State, left, and for White House Chief of Staff Jacob Lew to be named Treasury Secretary, right, bear President Barack Obama's signature after the president signed them on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, following the president's ceremonial swearing-in during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:55 PM


  • Presidential inaugurations: 1789-1893

    Jan. 21 2:12 p.m. EST
    APRIL 30, 1789: This Currier and Ives print is a reproduction of the scene at Old City Hall in New York as George Washington took oath of office. Left to Right : in foreground, Alexander Hamilton; Chancellor Livingston who administered the oath; Roger Sherman; secretary Otis of the Senate; Washington; John Adams; Baron Stueben; and General Knox. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:31 PM
    MARCH 4, 1829: This artist's rendition shows the crush of people after President Andrew Jackson's inaugural ceremony, held on the East Portico of the Capitol building for the first time, in Washington, D.C.. Following the inaugural proceedings, more than 20,000 well-wishers came to the White House to meet President Jackson. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    MARCH 4, 1841: This is an artist's impression of President William Henry Harrison's inauguration in Washington, D.C. Harrison declined the offer of a closed carriage and rode on horseback to the Capitol, braving cold temperatures and a northeast wind. After speaking for more than an hour, he returned to the White House on horseback, catching a chill that eventually turned to pneumonia. He died a month later. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:35 PM
    MARCH 4, 1857: President James Buchanan delivers his address after being sworn in as the 15th president of the United States in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.. The oath was administered by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:39 PM
    MARCH 4, 1861: U.S. President Abraham Lincoln stands under cover at center of the Capitol steps during his inauguration in Washington, D.C.. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:41 PM
    MARCH 4, 1865: Abraham Lincoln's second inauguration is depicted in this painting as he takes the oath of office as the 16th president of the United States in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. The oath is administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:43 PM
    MARCH 4, 1869: Ulysses S. Grant takes the oath of office as the 18th President of the United States. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:44 PM
    MARCH 5, 1877: The public inauguration of Rutherford B. Hayes takes place in front of the U.S. Capitol on the East Portico in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:46 PM
    MARCH 4, 1881: President James A. Garfield takes the oath of office administered by Supreme Court Justice Noah H. Swayne. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:47 PM
    MARCH 4, 1889: Benjamin Harrison is sworn in as the 23rd president of the United States as he takes the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller on the east portico of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:57 PM
    MARCH 4, 1893: President Grover Cleveland reads his inaugural address from the steps of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. President Cleveland was sworn in as the 24th president of the United States in a ceremony administered by Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM
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